NASCLA Accredited Electrical Examination Program

NASCLA Accredited Electrical Examination Program

The National Association of State Contractors Licensing Agencies (NASCLA) has partnered with several industry stakeholders to create one nationally recognized accredited trade examination for electricians. NASCLA will offer (3) different open book electrical trade examinations through the NASCLA Accredited Electrical Examination Program: Electrical Contractors (Master/Unlimited Electricians), Journeyman Electricians and Residential Electrical Contractors (Residential Electricians).

 

 

Faqs:

NASCLA Accredited Electrical Examination Program

What is the NASCLA Accredited Electrical
Examination Program? 
The NASCLA Accredited Electrical Examination Program was
developed to meet the needs of regulatory agencies across the
country and to improve the overall quality and validity of trade
licensing examinations for electricians.
The Examination Program consists of three (3) open-book
electrical trade examinations: one (1) for electrical contractors
(master/unlimited electricians), one (1) for journeyman electricians
and one (1) for residential electrical contractors (residential
electricians).
The examinations were developed by Subject Matter Experts
with diversified backgrounds from around the country to ensure
that each exam accurately represents the work performed in
jurisdictions throughout the United States. These examinations
were developed under the highest psychometric and electrical
standards.
What are the benefits for regulatory
agencies?
For regulatory agencies, the Examination Program allows states
to share a common standard, so that each state can review exam
results from other states with the assurance that the results meet
their own standards.
The Examination Program allows regulatory agencies to pool
resources with other states to continue developing consistently
improved standards for electrical examinations.
These pooled resources also make possible significant
cost savings for the development and administration of the
examinations for each participating agency. Finally, states
can more easily provide a new and improved examination
infrastructure with established expertise.
What are the benefits for electricians?
For electricians, the Examination Program offers the potential for
greater mobility—allowing electrical contractors and electricians
to move quickly between participating states to provide
assistance during natural disasters, or to help meet demand in
states with a high need but limited supply of qualified electricians.
The shared examinations also reduce the need for electricians to
spend time, money and stress traveling to different states to take
multiple exams.
Is the NASCLA Accredited Electrical
Examination Program considered a
“National License”?
No. The Examination Program provides a shared standard for
examinations, but it is not intended to create a “National License.”
Each regulatory agency will maintain its sovereignty and will be in
control of its state’s licensing requirements.
Who can take the examinations?
The Examination Program consists of three (3) examinations, one
(1) for each of the following job types:
Electrical Contractors (Master/Unlimited Electricians):
One who conducts business in the installation, maintenance
and repair of electrical work conforming to applicable
standards and codes.
Journeyman Electricians:
An individual who has
demonstrated capacity in the knowledge and skills needed to
properly perform the installation, maintenance and repair of
electrical work conforming to applicable standards and codes.
Residential Electrical Contractors (Residential
Electricians):
One who demonstrates competency in
performing electrical installations, service, repair and
maintenance typically encountered in a permanent dwelling unit.
How was the NASCLA Accredited
Electrical Examination Program
developed?
NASCLA invited Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from across
the country to a series of workshops to develop a job analysis
for each examination. The SMEs had a broad and diverse
background in the electrical field, including a variety of experience
in residential, commercial, industrial, high-voltage, low-voltage,
photovoltaic, electrical signs, and other specialized work.
Following the initial SME Workshops, NASCLA conducted
national surveys of electricians in each examination category.
Survey recipients were compiled through lists provided by state
regulatory agencies along with partner associations working with
NASCLA throughout this process. The survey asked respondents
to review the job analysis for each category and to rate the
frequency and importance of the knowledge and skills needed to
perform each task. A representative sample of survey responses
was received from all states to confirm whether the SMEs
were on point in the creation of each job analysis. In follow up
workshops, the SMEs used these responses to revise or ratify the
job analyses.
Finally, the SMEs created the questions for each examination.
With guidance from NASCLA’s Psychometrician, the SMEs
crafted, evaluated and verified over 1,000 questions, covering the
knowledge and skills needed for each job type.
Regulatory agencies can review the scope of work described
in the Job Analysis for each examination—as well as the Test
Specifications—and make informed decisions about choosing
the NASCLA Accredited Electrical Examination Program as their
state standard.
How will the examinations be
administered?
The examinations have been designed to make it easy for
regulatory agencies to implement. The exams will be housed on
a third-party hosted server that will allow each agency to utilize
their preferred testing administrator to give the examinations.
Each testing administrator will also be able to use their current
scheduling system to register and schedule examinees for the
examinations.
How are examination results stored
and delivered?
Once a candidate has taken and passed a NASCLA Accredited
Examination, their information is stored in the NASCLA National
Examination Database (NED). Candidates can electronically send
a regulatory agency their transcript through the database to
alert the agency that they have passed one (1) or more of the
examinations. Regulatory agencies can then pair the transcript
with the candidate’s license application.
Who created the NASCLA Accredited
Electrical Examination Program?
The NASCLA Accredited Electrical Examination Program was
initiated by the National Association of State Contractors
Licensing Agencies (NASCLA) in cooperation with the following
associations:
• National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA)
• Independent Electrical Contractors (IEC)
• National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)
• International Association of Electrical Inspectors (IAEI)
• Western Electrical Contractors Association (WECA)
Who is NASCLA?
The National Association of State Contractors Licensing Agencies
(NASCLA) was formed in 1962 for the mutual assistance of its
members in striving for the better regulation of the construction
industry to protect the health, welfare and safety of the general
public. It has since grown to a membership of forty-one (41)
contractor licensing agencies in twenty-seven (27) states,
Washington, D.C., two (2) territories, and one (1) foreign country

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